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Stem Cells: Biology and Applications

26th Annual International Symposium

 

The potential of stems cells and induced pluripotent stem cells iPSCs to be differentiated and returned to one’s own body as a therapeutic source of “replacement” cells or tissue is on the horizon. The 26th Annual International Symposium of the Center for Study of Gene Structure and Function described the basic science of iPSC and other stem cell developments, pioneering experiments and ethical implications.

 

In one morning and two afternoon sessions, ten scientists discussed their basic and/or clinical research, and one distinguished medical ethicist/writer discussed participation, benefits, and risks of stem cell research. The morning session focused on the ability to derive pluripotent stem cells and their ability to be differentiated into specific populations for therapeutic purposes. The first afternoon session delved into the applied science aspects of directed differentiation and the ethical implications of obtaining biological material and reintroducing modified versions back into patients. The second afternoon session started by discussing the mechanism of tissue regeneration in an invertebrate with its potential implications for cell replacement in mammals by reinvigorating inherent stem cell populations. The symposium concluded by discussing tissue engineering or synthesis in the lab with the possibility of reintroduction into the body.

Symposium Planning Committee: 

Chair: Paul Feinstein, Hunter College
Robert Dottin, Hunter College
Benjamin Ortiz, Hunter College
Armin Lahiji, Hunter College
Lorenz Studer, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
Koen van Besien, Weill Cornell Medical College
Denise Charles, Hunter College

 

Program Leadership: 

Robert Dottin, Principal Investigator, Center for Study of Gene Structure and Function, Professor of Biological Sciences, Hunter College, CUNY
Jesus Angulo, Program Director, Center for Study of Gene Structure and Function, Professor of Biological Sciences, Hunter College, CUNY
Rodrigo Valles, Jr., Associate Program Director, Center for Study of Gene Structure and Function, Hunter College, CUNY
Julianne Imperato-McGinley, Associate Dean of Translational Research, Weill Cornell Medical College

 

CTBR Staff: 

Coordinator: Denise Charles, Program Administrator for Communications and Outreach
Leah Abraha, Program and Evaluation Coordinator
Megan Anderson, Collaborations and Development Coordinator
Richard Baldwin, Web Programmer
Vincent Cayenne, Web Programmer
Christine Gonzalez, Associate Program Manager
Carlos Lijeron, Internet2 Facility Manager
Raul Morales, Network Facility Manager
Jeanne Waxman, Program Manager
Shirley Yang, Program Coordinator