Your browser (Internet Explorer 7 or lower) is out of date. It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites. Learn how to update your browser.

X

Navigate / search

Early-life Factors and Cancer Development Later in Life (R03)

Key Dates: 
  • Posted Date: February 26, 2015
  • Open Date (Earliest Submission Date): May 16, 2015
  • Letter of Intent Due Date(s): Not Applicable
  • Application Due Date(s); Standard dates apply, by 5:00 PM local time of applicant organization. All types of non-AIDS applications allowed for this funding opportunity announcement are due on these dates. Applicants are encouraged to apply early to allow adequate time to make any corrections to errors found in the application during the submission process by the due date.
  • AIDS Application Due Date(s): Standard AIDS dates apply, by 5:00 PM local time of applicant organization. All types of AIDS and AIDS-related applications allowed for this funding opportunity announcement are due on these dates. Applicants are encouraged to apply early to allow adequate time to make any corrections to errors found in the application during the submission process by the due date.
  • Scientific Merit Review: Standard dates apply
  • Advisory Council Review: Standard dates apply
  • Earliest Start Date: Standard dates apply
Purpose: 

The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to stimulate research focused on the role of early-life factors in cancer development later in life. Given that current emerging evidence from limited research indicates a potentially important role for early-life events and exposures in cancer development, it is necessary to better understand 1) the early-life (maternal-paternal, in utero, birth and infancy, puberty and adolescence, and teenage and young adult years) factors that are associated with later cancer development; 2) how early-life factors mediate biological processes relevant to carcinogenesis; and 3) whether predictive markers for cancer risk based on what happens biologically at early-life can be measured and developed for use in cancer prevention strategies. Markers that predict malignancy or pre-malignant conditions would allow assessment of early-life exposures with relevant outcomes without having to wait 50 years for cancer development. Ultimately, a better mechanistic understanding of how early-life events and exposures contribute to the etiology of cancer later in life will allow for the development of effective interventions during pregnancy or early life that may have a profound impact on cancer prevention.

Expiration Date: 
Monday, January 8, 2018
Announcement Number: 
PA-15-124